Wednesday, December 27, 2017

LP Review: "Even Gods Must Die" by Djinn and Miskatonic

Even Gods Must Die
How do you like your metal served?

I was talking to a gent on the Twitter recently who hates doom metal, unless it's melancholic funeral etc doom metal.

Personally, I don't have the qualifications there, I mean, most types of doom metal are a-ok with me.

This is where we can totally get into those heavy metal family trees and take it all the way back to Deep Purple and Black Sabbath, but let's talk about Star Wars instead.

Have you seen The Last  Jedi?

One of the complaints is that this wasn't the story the fans wanted to see. So, that's why it's bad, because the fans wanted Rian Johnson to tell a different story rather than the one he did.

That's my favorite kind of art there in the world.  Don't ever give me the story the fans want you to tell.

That's the laziest and most unartistic thing any artist of any stripe can do.

The Last Jedi from scene to scene had me guessing over and over. That's what I want.

Djinn and Miskatonic also seem to like keeping their listeners in the dark.

This is the closest thing I could find to their photo in the press photos sent with the album, but it's probably not them....but maybe?

When this record starts, it's a funeral chant, presumably for the god of terrible and bland metal. It's certainly time for that deity to die, is it not?

It just takes off from there...well, after the fifteen minute PLUS opening track. Instead of just making another couple songs like that one and turning in the album for pressing, Djinn and Miskatonic took each song and made it fit into a wider scheme.

The wide angle lens sees how all of this fits together in a masterfully worked artisanal, locally sourced, and gluten free slab of metal.

Release: 1/10/18
Genre: Doom  Metal
Label: Transcending Obscurity India
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2 comments:

  1. Okay, so... one thing I don't get. Was it ever marketed as a sequel? I wouldn't put it past VHS distributors back in the 80s/90s, but judging by the recap alone, there's no real connection to the plot and the characters of The Gods Must Be Crazy. It's not even set in the same time period

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  2. Consider that Gods was produced during the oppressive apartheid regime. Already we should be on the lookout for political overtones. When the movie begins, a narrator describes the lives of the "Bushmen" in South Africa. He speaks in a declarative, documentary-style voice. We are shown images of Bushmen, otherwise known as the San people, hunting and finding water in the desert. The film seems to offer evidence supporting the claims of the apartheid governments that the blacks were living decently well and receiving fair treatment. This is all false, so let me explain how this movie is actually a piece of propaganda.. yidio And zmovies

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